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Perdomo 2 – Limited Edition 2008

The Cigar Nut

Size: 5 x 50 (Robusto) Wrapper: Maduro Binder and Filler: Nicaraguan Strength: Medium to Full Price: Just over $6.00 a piece

Perdomo Squared

Behind The Stick:

Since I was corrected from the start, this is not a Perdomo 2 but rather the ‘Perdomo Squared’, perhaps due to the box pressing of the cigars or just a catchy addition to a famous and longstanding name. I personally had never tried a Perdomo before these so before I actually sat down and started smoking a few for a review I thought it was only proper to do some digging and find out who these people are and what brought them to the cigar industry. It never ceases to amaze me at the depth of these peoples history, what chance occurrences brought them to be the individuals we know today.

As with all things, its best to start at the beginning – In this case, Silvio Perdomo, who was a man born in San Jose de las Lajas, Cuba ended up using his last name and his earned skills through life to create one of the more well known and respected manufacturing names within the cigar world. He worked his way up through the ranks beginning with the Cuesta y Cia factory, moving to the H. Upmann for almost 9 years and finally worked with the company Partagas in Cuba until 1959 or so. Silvio’s son, Nick Perdomo Sr. followed after his fathers footsteps starting at the Marin and Trujillo factory, earning education, skills and a large amount of respect, he was able to join his father working at the Partagas factory.

One may think that this was the golden days of their lives, money was coming in, the family was being more than supported and growing and to top it off, they more than enjoyed their daily jobs. Unfortunately this could not be further from the truth, for as many Cubans, Silvio was against the ‘New Cuba’ that Castro was trying to impose on the civilians. He was arrested, at his own home, which lead to a quick trial forcing Silvio into incarceration at Isle of Pines prison which from the information I have gathered was one of the worst, if not the worst, prison in all of Cuba. This was the first domino to fall that threw this family into a tailspin that could not even be summarized within a full book or movie.

Nick Perdomo Sr. has political views very similar to his father which may have lead to his near fatal, but definitely critical attack. Nick reports that although he was not personally involved with the former president of Cuba, he was intrigued by the new cigar styles and shapes that the Perdomo family was creating. Nick was quoted saying “Batista didn’t smoke cigars but, because it’s one of Cuba’s main exports, he was very interested in what my father and I were doing with the different cigar shapes and styles we were experimenting with.” He continued “The communists must’ve thought I was a close friend of Batista. I’ve still got two bullets inside of me to prove it.”

Perdomo Squared

Although for time sake I will shorten the story, Nick moved to the United States and began working on raising his own family. Nick Sr. married his sweetheart, had their sons Nick Perdomo Jr. and William Perdomo and after many years was finally able to bring his father, Nick Jr’s grandfather Silvio, to America – once and for all out of the Cuban prison system. Silvio, Nick Sr. and Nick Jr. started their legacy shortly after moving from Baltimore to Miami sitting around their kitchen table rolling and wrapping cigars, teaching the children the time-earned mastery of cigar rolling.

1991 was the big year, the first year that the Perdomo line really began moving forward. They were able to purchase a small factory in Little Havana. They were able to upgrade to a larger factory shortly after but 1996 was a truly defining moment for the Tabacalera Perdomo. The company was able to move its manufacturing capabilities from Miami, Florida to Esteli, Nicaragua but within all the good news, the man who has started it all, Silvio Perdomo, passed away in his sleep no more than six months later.

To wrap up the history and bring us to the current time – the Perdomo factory has done nothing but grow in size, currently holding over 88,000 square feet of land in Esteli, Nicaragua – land which has been nicknamed ‘El Monstro’ by the townspeople. The use some of the highest quality control methods as well as using a specialized draw machine specifically designed for their factory to ensure the best draw on each of their sticks.

I was unable to pull up much info directly related to the Perdomo squared with the exception that this is a re-released of an older blend and that they were actually released in 2007 rather than the 2008 that the band indicated. Either way, with such rich history I can’t wait to get into one of their great cigars.

Construction:

I don’t know if it is from the skilled hands in Nicaragua or the tough construction requirements from the Perdomo factory but the few I was able to try were near perfect. The wrapper was slightly ‘splotchy’ and seemed to have oily and dry spots on the same wrapper which was interesting in its own respect. The cigars were decently packed, more give being obviously present at the foot.

Perdomo 2

Flavor:

Man, I sure do love these maduro wrappers! This one started off with a punch of spice, earth and a smooth coffee like flavoring which seemed to swap back and forth almost every puff. Nothing to scream about, but near the middle of the first third the flavoring began to turn sweet which I attribute to the characteristics of the maduro wrapper. As the cigar continued, the coffee and earth dropped off and was replaced with a semi-sweet chocolate – I gotta say this is where the cigar really began to shine.

Overall:

I read a few other reviews on the stick and I’ve heard issues from quick burn, deep runs with the burn line and even poor draw quality but with the three that I tried, each one smoked perfectly. The room aroma of this cigar really is something to behold, not what one may consider a ‘big, stinky cigar’ but rather a strong and sweet tobacco scent that does not overpower. The wrapper consistancy on each was spot on (with the oddity in oil/no oil) as well as the packing of tobacco within each cigar, followed by a very reasonable price, I will be looking for these the next time I purchase some cigars.

Perdomo Squared

Every Cigar Has A Story, Every Smoke A Memory

  • http://perdomo.com.au/blog/2010/02/20/the-cigar-nut-reviews-the-perdomo-2-limited-edition/ Cameron Reilly

    Hey thanks for the review! I’ve blogged it on the Perdomo blog! http://perdomo.com.au/blog/2010/02/20/the-cigar-nut-reviews-the-perdomo-2-limited-edition/

  • http://www.casasfumando.com Tony Casas

    Great review with tons of great information. My local shop just got these in last week and the owner (that has badass taste) swears by them. Perdomo never really impressed me, I’ve liked thier cigars quite a bit, but nothing ever stood out to me. After reading this review I am sure I will be picking a few up. Keep it up bro!

  • http://twitter.com/GrimSoftware Ray

    I have 100+ of these in my humi. All purchased at a very reasonable price. These cigars are very well constructed and consistent. I like the Robusto because there’s just enough cigar to leave you wanting more of the same the next day — not overpowering.

  • http://cigarpairings.blogspot.com Bruce

    Nick made some good cigars for a while back in the 90′s and then I think the growth was too fast – I thought product quality started to lack and I stopped buying Perdomos – fast forward to now – I got a good buy an the Perdomo 2 natural and bought a 5 pack. I have to say, I have enjoyed them – the burn has been good the draw perfect. Flavor is good. And, it is nice with the right beer. I’ll have to try the maduro now after seeing your review.

  • Bofh

    Here is a cigar that you and I both really enjoy. And these can be had pettry darn cheap. I would highly recommend it for someone who is looking for a great affordable maduro. This one has just enough strength to keep you coming back for more but can really be smoked any time of day. Great Review!